Thursday, September 12, 2019

APRS, WiRES-X, and stuff

Seems that my absolute favorite thing when it comes to either computers or ham radio... is changing around my setup in the never ending quest to improve it. Well, this post will describe my latest result.

I have wrestled long and hard over WiRES-X. The fact that this requires Windows running on a PC was a huge inconvenience with me being a Mac user. Most of the popular WiRES-X rooms are bridged to C4FM reflectors anyway. And accessing them that way removes literally all the hassle.

But... I recently tried an experiment. It was yet another attempt to get by without any computer at all. I was doing just iPad and iPhone. And I was actually fine with that. This meant... heck if I don't really even need a computer for my day to day stuff... I can totally dedicate my iMac to running Windows for the purpose of my various ham radio software. Problem solved. So I've done that. RIP macOS.

I've also been playing around with APRS lately. This is pretty cool! And I have four different radios that have that feature built in. However, to do this correctly for my home station... the capabilities of my radio will not suffice. So I had to add a TNC for two-way APRS communications. With the TNC and a dedicated ham radio computer... I can now run a two-way iGate. This will give me maximum functionality and fun from my APRS experience.

Part of doing the APRS thing correctly involved using my best antenna for it. With all the stuff I'm doing I have more radios than antennas. So something had to give. Now we're back to the hassles of running WiRES-X. I have always maintained that using an HRI-200 with an FTM-100 node radio is the best way to run a WiRES-X node. But I think I've now seen the light.

I decided to use my FTM-100 in PDN direct mode instead of the traditional HRI-200 node. This mode does not output RF so no antenna is required. And only needs one radio. That’s pretty handy because it frees up my main antenna and my FTM-400 for use with APRS and local repeaters.

Saturday, July 20, 2019

Ham radio, again

Back in February I made the decision to jump back into amateur radio. I’ve had an extra class license for a number of years. So I have the maximum privileges. And I just renewed it for another ten.

I dropped a pretty good load of cash on a bunch of new gear. Probably the biggest piece of the expenditure is an HF setup that I haven’t even used yet.

This is partly due to laziness. It’s also partly due to being so entertained with the other gear that I bought that I haven’t really been wanting for more to keep me busy.

The HF setup I have uses an outdoor portable-style antenna. I did this because we have antenna restrictions where we live. While I’m not allowed to have a permanent antenna outdoors, I can’t see that it would be a problem to have one that I setup and take down each time I use it.

So this is what I have. But that actually presents a bit of a barrier to actually using the thing. All my other gear is setup to where I can just sit down and use it any time I like. But the HF rig, I have to hassle with setting the antenna up each time. So I haven’t done it yet.

Another aspect is... I have never really understood how to operate on HF. And conditions aren’t good these days. I am really expecting that it will be a frustrating experience when I do get around to trying it. For many this is the most fun part of the hobby. For me… I haven’t spent enough time doing it to really get the hang of it yet.

On the other hand… virtually all of the other gear that I bought is oriented to digital communications via the internet. Yes, some will say that this isn’t “radio”. But the fact is, it has four things that are very much in the spirit of amateur radio.

First, I am talking into a radio on my end. And the person I’m talking to is typically talking into a radio on their end. So we still get to play with the cool gear. It’s really a minor technicality that it’s the internet that is connecting us.

Second, this form of digital communications has the aspect of enabling conversations with interesting people around the world. And for me, that has always been the most appealing aspect of ham radio. Good conversation!

Third, when using these digital modes there is really plenty of tinkering around to do. Sure, maybe there is more computer tech and less radio tech. But it’s still tinkering all the same.

Fourth, there is the aspect of a cohesive community. Hams helping hams has a long tradition. And with many internet groups dedicated to this digital communication tech, there is plenty of opportunity to learn and help others learn.

One major difference between these digital modes that use the internet vs HF, is that communicating via the internet is quite reliable. It is not dependent on solar conditions or propagation. Whereas operating HF is very hit and miss. In my experience, one can operate for hours without even making one contact. 

There is no doubt that I will be trying out my HF gear before too long. Maybe even today. I do know that I picked out some good gear. And it ought to be a lot of fun. My challenge will be learning the appropriate operating procedures for the mode. People do things differently on HF.

Regardless, so far my foray back into ham radio has been a lot of fun. There are so many things to learn that I think the process could go on for quite awhile.

Monday, March 4, 2019

Ham shack

I recently decided to jump back into amateur radio with both feet. This last weekend I picked up a bunch of gear. And I have a couple of radios still on their way. Our little home office (man cave) is now looking like an actual ham shack.

Previous to this, I was using a couple of raspberry pi VoIP nodes to do IRLP, AllStarLink, and echolink. I was using a handheld transceiver to utilize this. Well, I unplugged that stuff and decided I would try some new things.

 Here is a list of my new capabilities:
  • I now have a regular VHF/UHF dual-band dual-receive mobile rig as part of my shack. This is an improvement.
  • I now have HF. And a very capable radio at that. Unfortunately I am stuck with a definite compromise for an antenna in that I will be using something small, portable, and temporary. I will set it up outside when I want to use it. And take it down when I am not. I have very little choice about this due to neighborhood restrictions. Although the antenna situation may evolve into something better if I get creative.
  • I've added D-Star capability. I built a little D-Star hotspot using a raspberry pi with a DVAP. And I obtained a new handheld transceiver that has D-Star capability. 
  • I have also added WiRES-X capability. To do this right I went ahead and ordered the official WiRES-X interface box and a node radio. One downside is, this forces me to run Windows on my desktop computer system. This will be a big change. I'm not that happy about this aspect. Luckily I already had my Mac setup to dual boot. So it's doable. 
Most people reading this probably don’t know what these things are. Here is some explanation:
  • HF is a mode that uses radio frequencies to potentially communicate with other hams around the world. Signals bounce off the ionosphere. 
  • VHF/UHF is pretty much local only. It’s a line-of-sight mode that uses repeater systems located at high elevations to communicate with others. 
  • D-Star and WiRES-X are digital modes that are directly supported by radio manufacturers. These modes use UHF/VHF as described above. In addition, they use the internet to link repeaters (or private nodes) together. This facilitates long distance communications where one can talk to individuals and groups of users around the world. There are typically radios and repeaters on each end of the connection, with internet in between.